Occasional Papers Series

Occasional Papers of the Museum

The Occasional Papers is a digital publication series offered by the Turks and Caicos National Museum. It is dedicated to providing an outlet for scholarly inquiry that pertains to the history, archaeology, and culture of the Turks and Caicos Islands in particular and the Caribbean in general.

If you are interested in submitting a manuscript for electronic publication in the series, please contact the editor, Dr. Matt Williamson at mwilliam@georgiasouthern.edu.

To access a report, click on the title.


Occasional Paper #1: The Archaeological Exploration of Ft George Cay, October-November 2009 (Donald H. Keith, PhD and Toni L. Carrell, PhD)

Abstract: Archaeological exploration of Ft. George Cay began on October 23, 2009 and ended two weeks later on November 6, 2009. Impetus for this project began in 2008 with the realization that after decades of casual artifact collecting, limited historical research, and mapping, there were still no answers to even simple questions such as: How big is the site? Is it confined to Ft. George or are the surrounding cays also involved? Which military units occupied the fort? How much of  the site has been lost to the sea? Were British soldiers buried on the cay? The archaeological exploration described in this report is an effort to answer some of these questions, but it is only one part of a larger effort that includes, on-going archival research, artifact conservation and analysis, museum exhibit preparation, public relations, and management planning designed to make Ft. George accessible to the public without destroying its natural beauty in the process.


Occasional Paper #2: Report to the Department of Environment and Coastal Resources of the Turks and Caicos Islands on the Archaeological Survey of Endymion Rock Nov. 27- Dec. 13, 2007 (Donald H. Keith, Ph.D)

Abstract: The purpose of this investigation was twofold: to examine the HMS Endymion that ran aground August 23, 1790 on a hidden reef south of the island of Salt Cay in the Turks and Caicos Islands, BWI and field test all survey systems on board two ships from the Waitt Institute for Discovery (WID).  The WID team performed a side-scan sonar and magnetometer survey of a 12 nm2 area around and beyond the reef where the Endymion is located that helped to discover and map numerous cannons, iron ballast bars, and at least two anchors.  They also located the wreckage of more recent ship, tentatively identified as the General Pershing that went missing on July 11, 1921.  Among the items associated with this wreck is part of a large hot bulb oil diesel engine.